Deadheading: The six types of plants to deadhead regularly in your garden

[ad_1]

Deadheading is done to remove faded or dead growth from plants, and is one of the easiest gardening tasks to do. While it may seem simple, deadheading can have a significant impact on the appearance of your garden, but which types of plants do you need to do it to? These are the six key plants to deadhead regularly in your garden.

The best time to deadhead the garden in plants is when the spent flowers begin to look scruffy and faded.

For best results, it is recommended that deadheading should be done as soon as possible, so it is crucial to look out for the earliest signs that your plant has finished flowering.

While all flowering or fruiting plants will benefit from being deadheaded at least once after they stop blooming, some varieties should be tended to more regularly.

READ MORE: Laundry: How to properly remove ‘yellow’ stains from pillows

Deadheading is done to remove faded or dead growth from plants, and is one of the easiest gardening tasks to do. While it may seem simple, deadheading can have a significant impact on the appearance of your garden, but which types of plants do you need to do it to? These are the six key plants to deadhead regularly in your garden.

Bedding plants

According to the Royal Horticultural Society (RHS), tender plants growing in beds, containers and hanging baskets respond well to deadheading.

Once the bright blooms have faded on your bedding flowers, it’s time to remove all spent or weak petals and free-up some space for new growth to flourish.

Deadheading bedding flowers is as simple as picking away wilted blooms with a pinch of your finger and thumb, but which flowers should you focus on?

Argyranthemums, Cherry pie, Pansies, Polyanthus and Petunias will all respond well to light deadheading without any tools – and it can be done in just a matter of minutes.

Shrubs

Deadheading can produce impressive results on most plants, but shrubs are one variety you should pay special attention to.

The RHS said: “Among the most important shrubs to deadhead are rhododendron (and azaleas), camellias, lilacs and tree peonies.”

For a tool-free approach, use your finger and thumb to pick or snap off each dead-head where it joins the stem.

Secateurs can be used to cut just below the flower head, though you should avoid damaging buds or developing growths which sit immediately below the flower.

Climbers

Climbers should be deadheaded regularly where practical – particularly Eccremocarpus, as it rapidly produces seed pods.

Secateurs are the best way to remove spent blooms on intertwining vines, so make sure they are clean and sharp before attempting to remove unsightly blooms.

Bulbs

Flowers should always be removed from larger bulbs, such as daffodils, as soon as they appear wilted or dead.

Take care to remove the seed capsule alongside the spent blooms, while leaving the green flower stalk in place.

The stalk plays a crucial role in future growth of the plant as it helps to photosynthesise, encouraging a flush of healthy flowers the following season.



[ad_2]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Previous Story

Gutfeld: Masks might become part of the American Left's identity forever

Next Story

Wimbledon's Russian ban is the correct call to keep stars like Daniil Medvedev safe

Latest from Blog

withemes on instagram