‘Natural booster’: Household drinks to use when watering the garden – ‘promotes growth’

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Buying products to use in the garden, such as weed killers, can be expensive as well as cause harm to the environment. Gardening experts at Gardening Express have shared different drinks to use in the garden instead, some of which can even be used as fertilisers, which could save gardeners time and money. Chris Bonnett, founder of Gardening Express said: “People might be surprised to hear that a lot of household drinks can actually be used in their gardens and on their plants.

“If you have some spare or flat cola this is a great alternative to weed killers and some drinks like milk and tea actually work as fertilisers.

“Of course, they’re not as strong as store bought ones but they’re definitely better for the environment and are a more eco-friendly option.

“A lot of these techniques are best off being used in moderation, for example adding too much orange juice and milk could potentially do more harm to your plants than good and could result in killing them if overused.”

The experts recommended using vodka in the garden to act as a pesticide and a weed killer.

READ MORE: Monty Don: How to weed ‘properly’ to prevent regrowth

According to the experts at Gardening Express, orange juice can be used as an alternative to fertiliser.

Recommended in moderation, mix some orange juice in with water when watering the plants in the garden.

The experts added: “Some plants like daffodils and roses will welcome tea leaves as a fertiliser. This won’t be as strong as using a store bought fertiliser but it’s a good option if you don’t have some handy in the house and it’s also a lot more eco-friendly.”

Milk can also be used to help plants grow, with vitamin B and calcium promoting healthy growth and reducing the risk of calcium deficiency, especially important for tomatoes.

Gardening Express said: “Create a diluted solution of milk that is half water and half milk, pour it into a spray bottle and spray it over your garden.

“Like most things, you’ll want to do this in moderation; too much milk can harm your plants.”



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